This map shows you every single German island we could find. What did we miss?

When you think of Germany, you probably think of the typical stuff like beer, lederhosen, the Berlin Wall, trains, etc. But after looking at this map, you should also think of ocean islands!

It’s weird, isn’t it? We usually associate a smattering of near-coast islands with nations like Greece, Italy, or Japan. But Germany has its fair share as well! Have a look:

  1. Borkum
  2. Kachelotplate
  3. Memmert
  4. Juist
  5. Norderney
  6. Baltrum
  7. Langeoog
  8. Spiekeroog
  9. Insel Lütje Hörn
  10. Wangerooge
  11. Langlütjen II
  12. Minsener Oog
  13. Mellum
  14. Heligoland & Helgoland-Düne
  15. Nigerhörn
  16. Neuwerk
  17. Trischen
  18. Südfall
  19. Nordstrandischmoor
  20. Hooge
  21. Gröde
  22. Oland
  23. Föhr
  24. Sylt
  25. Norddorf
  26. Nordmarsch-Langeneß
  27. Japsand (sand)
  28. Norderoogsand (sand)
  29. Hallig Süderoog
  30. Pellworm 
  31. Fehmarn
  32. Walfisch
  33. Insel Poel
  34. Insel Langenwerder
  35. Ummanz
  36. Großer Werder
  37. Bock
  38. Hiddensee
  39. Greifswalder Oie
  40. Ruden
  41. Usedom (Eastern half is Poland)
  42. Insel Vilm
  43. Rügen

Even though most are pretty far north, they aren’t all gloomy and gray! Poel (33) and Rügen (43) are both home to seaside resorts. Fehmarn (31) boasts over 2,200 hours of sun every year! Hiking, beautiful views, sandy beaches, and dense woods- German islands offer a little of everything!

The biggest German island is Rügen (575 sq. mi), followed by Usedom (231 sq. mi). Rügen is so big that it even has a so-called “countryside”. Rugians are proud people whose roots date back to the Stone Age.

©André Petzold

A small group of islands called the Hallig Islands (19, 20, 21, 22) are picturesque mudflats, with a World Heritage nature reserve within their shores.

Usedom is a split island with Poland. After World War II ended in 1945, it was formally divided between the two nations. Though more of the island belongs to Germany, its largest city, Świnoujście, belongs to Poland.

©Alexrk2

Which of these islands have you visited? Which did we miss? Write us @GermanyinUSA!

By William Fox, German Embassy

One thought on “This map shows you every single German island we could find. What did we miss?”

  1. Die Inselliste hat mich sehr interessiert. In meiner Jugend (in den 50ern) habe ich oft einen schoenen aber manchmal auch recht kuehlen Sommer auf Amrum verbracht. In Norddorf haben wir im Hotel (Name vergessen) gewohnt (Anmerkung: Norddorf ist nicht der Inselname, Amrum ist’s). Dabei habe ich dann auch Foehr, Sylt und Neuwerk besucht, Aber in der Ostsee war ich leider nie und habe nur ein paar Inselnamen gekannt. Muss das noch nachholen.

    Vielen Dank fuer Ihren immer lesenswerten Wochenbericht.

    Frank Rausche, Chagrin Falls, Ohio

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