Travel Tuesday: The Pig Museum

Countless plush pigs are presented in the pig museum in Stuttgart, Germany. The Stuttgart pig museum displays more than 50,000 lucky pigs, piggy banks and plush pigs. © dpa / picture-alliance

Are your kids tired of spending hours in “boring” museums?

Take them to the Pig Museum in Stuttgart, Germany!

This museum features 25 themed rooms with more than 50,000 different pigs, ranging from piggy banks to stuffed animal pigs. Visitors can learn about the evolution of different species of pigs, as well as myths and legends about pigs from around the world.

This museum is less than ordinary – and its history is unusual, too. The concept began when Erika Wilhelmer, the owner of the museum and an avid pig paraphernalia collector, decided to convert a slaughterhouse into a museum in 1988. Over the years, her collection grew – and in 1992 the Guinness Book of World Records declared it the world’s largest pig museum. Once the museum had reached 40,000 pig items, it was relocated to its current location in Stuttgart.

Whether you find pigs adorable or you have an appetite for them, the Pig Museum in Stuttgart is sure to teach you something new about these intelligent farm animals! And when you’re finished exploring the history and culture surrounding pigs, you can relax in the beer garden and order some delicious Swabian delicacies.

A tram decorated as a pig stands in front of the pig museum in Stuttgart, Germany. © dpa / picture-alliance
Countless piggy banks are presented in the pig museum in Stuttgart. © dpa / picture-alliance

The World Cup and its influence on German history

The German National Team before their final game in the 1954 World Cup. © dpa / picture-alliance

The 2018 World Cup has begun! With the games currently underway in Russia, let’s take a look back at some of Germany’s most important matches – and the meaning these games had for the German people.

During the 1954 World Cup in Switzerland, West Germany took home the gold, beating Hungary 3-2. At the time, Europe was still recovering from World War II, and Germany was struggling to rebuild itself and its reputation in the global community. The World Cup victory gave Germany a newfound sense of pride and happiness. Some historians even consider this victory a turning point for post-war Germany.

“It was a kind of liberation for the Germans from all the things that weighed down upon them after the Second World War,” wrote German historian Joachim Fest. “July 4, 1954 is in certain aspects the founding day of the German Republic.”

Twenty years later, West Germany became the host of the 1974 World Cup, which reinforced Germany’s sense of community on the world stage. The West German team also won the championship that year. But one of the most memorable moments in German soccer was when West Germany experienced its only loss of the tournament in a game against East Germany, thanks to a goal scored by Jürgen Sparwasser.

The fall of the wall marked another turning point in German soccer: the 1990 World Cup was once again won by the West German team, but it was clear that this would be the last time Germany competed with two teams. The victory was celebrated by both German teams, and a few months later, they were united. At the time, German soccer player Franz Beckenbauer was convinced that the united team would become unbeatable in the years to come.

Germany beats Argentina in the 1990 World Cup. © dpa / picture-alliance

And of course, most of us remember Germany’s most recent World Cup victory from 2014, which was also Germany’s first champion title since the 1990 championship.

Since the establishment of the World Cup in 1930, Germany has claimed four World Cup victories and hosted the games twice. Germany’s first World Cup game of 2018 took place on Sunday against Mexico and the second match will be held this coming Saturday against Sweden. Who will you be rooting for? We want to see photos from your soccer watch parties on social media! Be sure to tag us @germanyinusa – we will be reposting fun photos in which we see your German pride!

Travel Tuesday: Cochem

High up in the picturesque Moselle Valley is the town of Cochem. With an elevation of 272 ft and a population of 5,000, this historic town is truly a magical escape from city life.

Behind the colorful buildings that line the historic streets of Cochem is the Reichsburg Castle, which stands atop a hill and is surrounded by forests and vineyards. The castle, which is open for tours, dates back to the year 1100 and is filled with Baroque furniture and historic artifacts. During the Nine Years’ War in the late 1600s, the castle was destroyed, but it was reconstructed in the Gothic Revival Style in the 1800s. This hilltop castle is visible from most places in Cochem – and visitors who hike to the top are greeted with spectacular views of the town.

But even the town itself is worth a tour. Cochem is one of Germany’s oldest towns, dating back to early Celtic and Roman times. It is not known when the region was first settled, but it was first mentioned in the year 886. Over many centuries, the town survived the Plague, the French occupation, the Thirty Years’ War, the Second World War and other hardships, but it remained strong and held on to its charm.

Aside from its quaint buildings, Cochem is also known for its fine wines. With vineyards and family-run wineries surrounding the town,  Cochem is the center of the Mosel wine trade.

So if you’re in Germany this summer, make sure to stop by  Cochem for a glass of wine and spectacular views of a fairy-tale town and its castle!

By Nicole Glass, German Embassy

10 awesome drone videos of Germany

German lands are filled with majestic castles, historic villages, snow-capped mountains, beautiful lakes and deep forests. Drone footage has the potential to showcase this beauty.

Here are 10 awesome videos we found on YouTube taken by drones in Germany. Enjoy!

Germany Compilation

Bavaria

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Travel Tuesday: Oldenburg

The Oldenburg Castle.
© dpa / picture-alliance

If you’re looking for a modern Northern German travel destination with historic buildings and delightful traditions, Oldenburg is the place for you!

Oldenburg is located in the State of Lower Saxony, only 45 minutes from the North Sea. This makes it a perfect origin for day trips to the islands, harbors and beaches of Northern Germany.

Located on the river Hunte, Oldenburg is also often called the “Huntestadt”. The Hunte flows near the city center pedestrian zone past the palace gardens and flows into the old harbor.

When in Oldenburg, make sure to stroll through its walkable downtown. The city center was made car-free in 1967, making Oldenburg’s (quintessentially German) “pedestrian zone” the oldest area-wide one in the country. It is over 13 hectares and is filled with buildings spanning the centuries. At the edge of the zone there is the old powder tower, once part of the cities fortifications, which was built in 1529. There are old merchant houses from the 17th century and the palace dating back to the 16th century, to only name a few.

© Ra Boe / Wikipedia

Spared by war destruction, Oldenburg’s architecture is characterized by a lively mix of old buildings and modern neighborhoods. Well known are the gabled houses which are called “Hundehütten” due to their resemblance to dog houses.

© dpa / picture-alliance

So what does one do while in Oldenburg? Once a year, at the end of September/beginning of October, the city celebrates its “fifth season” – the Kramermarkt – established in 1608, a Volksfest (fair), visited by around 1.5 million people every year. Around the same time the “Grünkohlzeit” (kale season) begins. The city is well known for its kale with “Pinkel”, a type of sausage from the area. This is quite a different experience from the kale shakes and salads in the US! You will see many “Grünkohltouren” (kale tours) drawing handcarts through the streets, crowning a kale king and queen at the end of the tour.

Another name for this town which you might run into is “Pauldingburg”. This is because Detroit native Rickey Paulding has been playing for the local first-league basketball team “EWE Baskets Oldenburg” since 2007 – an unusually long time for a professional athlete, during which he has hooped his way into the hearts of Oldenburg’s citizens. And although Oldenburg is located in Northern Germany, Downton Abbey doesn’t feel far away! Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh and husband to Queen Elizabeth, is a patrilineal descended from one of the House of Oldenburg’s branches.

By Bastian Harms, German Embassy

Travel Tuesday: Flower Island

On the south shore of Lake Überlinger near Konstanz is a place commonly known as “Flower Island”. As the name implies, the 45 hectar island of Mainau is covered in colorful flowers as far as the eye can see, making it an attractive destinations for summertime travelers.

The small island is notable for its many parks and gardens – particularly its roses. The island is home to about 30,000 rose bushes consisting of 1,200 varieties and 20,000 dahlias of 250 varieties. The Italian Rose Garden alone has more than 500 varieties of roses!

It even has an arboretum with 500 species of trees and a greenhouse with a tropical climate and hundreds of free-flying butterflies. The gardens are also home to a peacock enclosure and a petting zoo with ponies and goats.

The island originally belonged to the Order of Teutonic Knights, but it was purchased by the Grand Duke Frederick I of Baden in 1853. Frederick I used the palace on the island as his summer residence. Over the years, ownership of the island changed hands many times. In 1932, under the ownership of Prince Wilhelm, Duke of Södermanland, the island was gifted to the prince’s only child, Lennart Bernadotte, who started a foundation that continues to manage the island today.

Today, the island is open daily to visitors. Travelers who come to the island can relax among a sea of flowers, view the baroque Mainau castle and enjoy views of Lake Überlinger and Lake Constance.

View from the Canoe – Wasserwandern in Germany

Wasserwandern is the German term for touring by water, traveling by canoe or a kayak along the designated waterways of multiple connected lakes or rivers. Rest areas, campgrounds and even restaurants are sometimes scattered along the route.

Known as the “land of a thousand lakes,” the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern’s many lakes are connected in vast networks. Formed tens of thousands of years ago during the Ice Age, these lakes are now home to a number of endangered species. As a result, the use of motor boats is not allowed in many of these lakes, which are now havens for kayakers and canoeists.

Gliding through the peaceful waters of the Müritz National Park in the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, one can experience nature up close and personal. Buoys mark the paths along which the kayaks and canoes may travel, and stopping is only allowed at designated rest areas to preserve the fragile ecosystems along the shores. Nevertheless, bird watching from this vantage point is a breeze. One may be lucky enough to see a Fischadler (osprey) or the colorful Eisvogel (kingfisher), which have found a home in the clean waters of the Müritz National Park.

© dpa / picture alliance

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5 summertime destinations in Berlin

Berlin is a lively city with vibrant nightlife and countless daytime activities. With summer around the corner, here are 5 awesome ways to spend the season’s most beautiful days!

1) Soak in the Badeschiff

When the sun comes out and the temperatures heat up, head over to Berlin’s Badeschiff (“bathing ship”) to enjoy the day on the Spree. This swimming pool floats in the River Spree – and the views of the city are fantastic! Plus, it’s next to a riverside beach where you can sip on a cocktail and soak up the sun.

© dpa / picture-alliance

2) Have a drink at the Club der Visionaere

The Club der Visionaere is a picturesque summertime spot between Kreuzberg and Treptower Park. It is a club along the water that hosts live electronic music concerts at night. Weeping willows surround the terrace, making it a beautiful venue to spend a summertime evening with friends.

© dpa / picture-alliance

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Travel Tuesday: The World’s Narrowest Street

Where is the world’s narrowest street?

Some might guess Venice. But according to the Guinness Book of World Records, the narrowest street is located in the town of Reutlingen, Germany.

© dpa / picture alliance

The Spreuerhofstraße is located between two closely linked buildings. This street is on average 40 centimeters (15.7 inches) wide, and just 31 centimeters (12.2 inches) wide at its narrowest point.

Although some may be inclined to call this an alleyway, the people of Reutlingen insist that it is in fact a street, since it is located on municipal land.

Let’s take a look at how this passageway became an official street:

© dpa / picture alliance

In 1727, the city was being reconstructed after a massive city-wide fire destroyed many parts of Reutlingen. In 1820, an administrator in the city’s town hall decided to elevate this gap between two houses into a street. It is wide enough for the average person to walk through, which is one of the prerequisites for the classification of a street. For a long time, Spreuerhofstraße did not receive much attention. But once the Guinness Book of World Records gave the street its title in 2007, tourists started flocking to Reutlingen to see it. But before you book your trip, keep in mind that this street is not particularly long or attractive and we would only recommend going there if you are in the area already!

And only time will tell how long this street will remain; one of the 18th century houses is already leaning into it, making it even smaller. It may soon be too small to be considered a street at all!

By Nicole Glass, German Embassy

Travel Tuesday: Pfaueninsel (“Peacock Island”)

Near southwest Berlin in the River Havel is a strange little island known as the Pfaueninsel (“Peacock Island”). As the name implies, this island is in fact home to a flock of wild peacocks – and these birds have been here for centuries!

© dpa / picture alliance

If you visit the island today, you’ll find yourself surrounded by greenery, abandoned buildings, peacocks and even an old castle.

To understand why, let’s take a look at the island’s history.

The 243 acre island was used for the first time in the 17th century, when William I of Brandenburg established a rabbit farm on the land. As a result, the island was called Kaninchenwerder (“Rabbit Island”).

© dpa / picture alliance

In 1793, Prussian king Frederick William II decided to use the island to build a castle for himself and his favorite mistress. This was primarily used as a summer residence.

The king’s successor and son, Frederick William III, had other ideas for the island. He turned it into a farm with grottos and aviaries and had exotic animals brought to the island, including alligators, kangaroos, buffalos, chameleons, monkeys, wolves, bears and (of course) peacocks. Over 900 animals of 100 species were brought to live on the island. The king then opened this exotic zoo up to the public.

Many people flocked to the island to see the exotic creatures, leading to overcrowding and chaos. Those responsible for the animals had to find a solution – the island simply wasn’t big enough to accommodate all those visitors.

In 1842, the animals were transferred to a location in Berlin (minus a few peacocks), which opened its gates in 1844. This became known as the “Berlin Zoo” and was the first zoo of its kind in Germany.

Meanwhile, the island went through a series of transitions and uses. Today, however, it remains home to free-ranging peacocks and exotic birds and is a designated nature reserve and UNESCO World Heritage Site. Frederick William II’s castle still stands on the island, and visitors can take a ferry over to see it.