Celebrating women in Germany

This week, we celebrated the successes of a number of influential women in Germany – women who have risen the ranks and strive for the betterment of Europe.

On Wednesday we celebrated the 65th birthday of Chancellor Angela Merkel, who has served as Chancellor since 2005 and is listed by Forbes as the “most powerful woman in the world.”

At the same time, Ursula Von der Leyen was elected 383 to 327 to become president of the European Commission, making her the first woman in history to hold the position. The EU Commission is the executive branch of the European Union, and the president is tasked to lead the EU’s executive body and provide political guidance. The Commission proposes new laws, manages the EU budget and enforces EU law, making Von der Leyen’s role an important one for the future of Europe.

©dpa / picture alliance

“In her speech, she called for a united and strong EU on which we now want to work together,” said Foreign Minister Heiko Maas in a statement congratulating Von der Leyen. “It was important that she made a clear commitment today to the rule of law and to a social and sovereign Europe based on the principle of solidarity. This is the right agenda for the EU, and it will be judged on that. The world will not wait for Europe. It is therefore essential that we look to the future and further develop the new Commission’s program swiftly.”

Replacing Von der Leyen as the Defense Minister is Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, leader of the German Christian Democrats. This will be Kramp-Karrenbauer’s first job in the federal government – and one that is no small task! She will oversee 250,000 soldiers and civilians in a challenging and high-profile position at a time when the Defense Ministry is undergoing extensive reforms.

These women have – and will continue to have – important roles that help form the future of Germany and the European Union. And alongside that, they also symbolize the power and influence that women have in Germany today, demonstrating that women can – and will – continue to play an important role in politics. Not only in Germany, but on a global scale.

By Nicole Glass, German Embassy