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The Week in Germany - March 5, 2021
March 5, 2021
The history of International Women's Day

Dear TWIG Readers,

Many of you celebrate the women in your lives (or the women you admire) during International Women's Day on Monday.

But did you know that the origins of this global day of observance can be at least partially traced back to German women?

The earliest Women's Day was held in New York City in 1909 in concurrence with an 11-week strike for women's rights, but it wasn't until 1910 that other countries got involved. In August of that year, an International Socialist Women's Conference was organized in Copenhagen, Denmark. During this meeting, German Socialists Luise Zietz, Clara Zetkin and Käte Duncker advocated for the establishment of an annual Women's Day. They had been inspired by the American observance during the prior year.

"When the men are silent, it is our duty to raise our voices on behalf of our ideals," Zetkin said.

One year later, on March 19, 1911, the world's first International Women's Day was marked, with participating countries including Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland (the United States held its observance on a different day). Women in Europe took to the streets with posters and signs, advocating for their right to vote and hold office, among other topics.

Although several women played a role in the establishment of International Women's Day, Zetkin is perhaps the most well-known. Zetkin was active in the Social Democratic Party of Germany, the Independent Social Democratic Party of Germany and later the Communist Party of Germany, which she represented during the Weimar Republic from 1920 to 1933.

Although the roots of International Women's Day were tied to socialism, the day of observance has evolved over time. This changed when the United Nations began celebrating the day in the year 1975 (the "International Women's Year"). Two years later, the UN General Assembly invited all of its member states to declare March 8 as the UN day for women's rights.

International Women's Day is even a federal holiday in Berlin since the year 2019! So far, Berlin is the first and only federal state in Germany that has declared this day a public holiday. But whether or not you are off on Monday, it's always a good idea to let the women in your life know how much they mean to you!

Nicole Glass

Webteam, German Embassy

 

New series: "Meet the Consul"
New series: "Meet the Consul"
Join us Wednesday, March 10 at 12 pm on Facebook Live to hear directly from our consular staff as they answer frequently asked questions. In our first episode, Consulate representatives will tell you everything you need to know about how to become a German citizen. Future episodes will be announced directly through Facebook.

Click here to hear from our Consul General
US-German and trans-Atlantic relations in the 21st century: Launch of the Fritz Stern Chair
US-German and trans-Atlantic relations in the 21st century: Launch of the Fritz Stern Chair
On Tuesday, March 9, Foreign Policy at Brookings will host German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas for a keynote address in honor of the launch of the Fritz Stern chair, followed by a panel discussion considering the current state of U.S.-German and U.S.-European relations and the prospects for reform to best address the challenges of the 21st century.

Register for the webcast
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How Marian Anderson inspired Germans
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Marian Anderson (1897-1993) was a world famous African American singer who made history on both sides of the Atlantic with her opera and spirituals. From the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to Salzburg and Munich, her voice inspired thousands of people with every show. But in order to perform, the American contralto had to face segregation and racial prejudice, both at home and abroad. Her determination to sing – despite opposition and countless hurdles – turned her into a civil rights icon. Some even called her the “voice of the 20th century“.
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She calls Tom Hanks “Tommypot” and has been nominated for a Golden Globe, which Jodie Foster has now received. At twelve years of age, Helena Zengel from Germany has made a flying start in Hollywood.
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Word of the Week: Geborgenheit
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The German word Geborgenheit is difficult to translate, but it encompasses a range of feelings that make it a powerful word. A translation dictionary might describe Geborgenheit as “feelings of security”, but that does not do the word justice. Geborgenheit is the sum of warmth, protection, security, trust, love, peace, closeness and comfort. Imagine all of those feelings described in one word – that’s Geborgenheit!
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